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The construction industry defends consultation with the ACT government, although some workers complain that they were “left read between the lines” when the sector closed. Construction workers were specifically listed as essential workers when the ACT was banned last year. But this time, the Territory’s 20,000 construction workers were informed through ACT Health’s website that only “essential infrastructure” would remain operational. One worker who wanted to remain nameless said his company stayed “read between the lines” as it struggled to find out which plants could stay alive. “The general consensus is [that] it was very vague. When the construction in Sydney closed it was all on the news, ”he said. READ MORE COVID-19 NEWS: The ACT was the third jurisdiction to halt construction during the Covid outbreaks, after breaks in South Australia and Sydney earlier this year. But ACT Master Builders Association executive director Michael Hopkins defended the ACT government message that came during a rapidly evolving situation: “Yesterday was an extremely busy time for everyone in government and in the business community who tried to get on To respond to these new rules, “he said,” We know the government did everything in its power to get this information out to the industry, which they did by the end of the day. “Mr. Hopkins said the best way for the government to support affected companies is to provide a “clear path”. “That’s why it’s important that everyone in the construction industry is doing everything possible right now to comply with health regulations,” he said. Adina Cirson, executive director of Proper The Australian Council’s ACT division announced that a meeting with industry leaders was scheduled just hours after the lockdown was announced. “When people said the news was a little confused yesterday, I think that’s right,” she said. “But I also think the government was very quick and done a good deal of research into how this would work.” I think there is no point pointing the finger here. Everyone is trying to be agile and think on their feet. ”Ms. Cirson said that attention is already on reopening the sector and further talks with the ACT government are expected later this week to get a plan as soon as possible possible to get a partial or full reopening, ”she said. READ MORE COVID-19 NEWS: Construction on Canberra Hospital continued in limited capacity, but residential and commercial real estate stalled, a transition period was put in place that allowed companies to ensure sites were securely secured. Minimal attendance was also allowed during the lockdown to confirm the location remained safe.Canberraners whose hours were impacted during the lockdown will have access to an emergency COVID-19 payment from the federal government. Ms. Cirson warned against support for construction, however, it would be more difficult if companies had to prove a lower income. “Building is not like having a cafe where your income is cut off immediately,” she said. “You may get settlement payments and all of those things that come in during the week of the lockdown,” Not really felt for a while. ” READ MORE COVID-19 NEWS: Ms. Cirson warned that a number of workers moved to Canberra during construction in Sydney, suffering from a skills shortage. “You will be returning to Sydney now because you can work in Sydney. We’re going to lose these people and we won’t get them back for the foreseeable future, ”he said. “We have a housing crisis at the moment. The demand for housing is so great that we really need to finish, unwind and get these projects back on the market. ”Our coverage of the health and safety aspects of this COVID-19 outbreak in the ACT and lockdown is free so anyone on it is on it However, we rely on subscription income to support our journalism. If you can, please register here. If you are already a subscriber, thank you for your support. You can also subscribe to our newsletter for regular updates Our journalists are working hard to keep the community updated with local, breaking news, so you can continue to access our trusted content:

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The construction industry defends consultation with the ACT government, although some workers complain that they were “left read between the lines” when the sector closed.

Construction workers were specifically listed as essential workers when the ACT was banned last year.

But this time, the Territory’s 20,000 construction workers were informed through ACT Health’s website that only “essential infrastructure” would remain operational.

One worker who wanted to remain nameless said his company stayed “read between the lines” as it struggled to find out which plants could stay alive.

“The general consensus is [that] it was very vague. When construction stopped in Sydney, it was all on the news, ”he said.

The ACT was the third jurisdiction to halt construction during Covid outbreaks, after breaks in South Australia and Sydney earlier this year.

But ACT Master Builders Association executive director Michael Hopkins defended the ACT government messages that emerged during a rapidly evolving situation.

“Yesterday was an extremely busy time for everyone in government and in the business community trying to respond to these new rules,” he said.

“We know the government did everything in its power to get this information out to the industry, which they did by the end of the day.”

Mr Hopkins said the best way for the government to support affected businesses is to provide a “clear path” to reopen.

“That’s why it’s important that everyone in the construction industry is doing everything they can to comply with health regulations,” he said.

Adina Cirson, executive director of the ACT division of the Property Council of Australia, announced that a meeting with industry leaders was scheduled just hours after the lockdown was announced.

“When people said the news was a little confused yesterday, I think that’s right,” she said.

“But I also think the government moved very quickly and did a good deal of research into how this would work.

“I don’t think it makes sense to point a finger here. Everyone tries to be agile and think on their feet.”

Ms. Cirson said that attention was already on reopening the sector and further talks with the ACT government are expected later this week.

“Let’s minimize the industry impact and try to come up with a plan to get a partial or full reopening as soon as possible,” she said.

Construction on Canberra Hospital continued on a limited scale, but residential and commercial real estate stalled.

A grace period of 24 hours has been introduced to allow organizations to ensure that locations are securely secured. Minimal attendance was also allowed during the lockdown to confirm that the site remained secure.

Even building owners during concreting, who subsequently required work to ensure stability, were able to fulfill their task.

Canberraners whose hours were affected during the lockdown will have access to a federal government COVID-19 emergency payment.

However, Ms. Cirson warned that it would be more difficult to provide support to construction companies who would have to report lower incomes from them.

“Building is not like having a cafe where your income is cut off immediately,” she said.

“You may get severance payments and all of those things that come in during the week of the lockdown.

“So you may not make more money the week of lockdown, but the longer-term effects of slowed construction won’t really be felt for some time.”

Ms. Cirson warned that a number of workers had moved to Canberra during the Sydney construction break.

However, she warned that a “total slowdown” in housing construction could cause ACT to experience a skills shortage.

“You are going to return to Sydney now because you can work in Sydney. We are going to lose these people and we are not going to get them back for the foreseeable future,” he said.

“At the moment we have a housing crisis. The demand for apartments is so great that we really have to complete these projects, develop them and bring them back onto the market.”

Our coverage of the health and safety aspects of this COVID-19 outbreak in the ACT and lockdown is freely available to everyone. However, we rely on subscription income to support our journalism. If you are able, please subscribe here. If you are already a subscriber, thank you for your support. You can also subscribe to our newsletter for regular updates.

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