news, latest news, construction, building, covid19, covid restrictions, canberra, covid, lock lock, canberra lock

ACT construction workers are being “actively encouraged” to get vaccinated against Covid as the industry prepares for a gradual reopening starting next week. The changes to the Covid restrictions announced on Friday have met mixed reactions from the construction industry, who say that after the now two-week closure, significant project delays are expected. ACT chief minister Andrew Barr outlined a number of changes to the business restrictions, including a gradual reopening of the building from the 3rd people-per-four-square-meter scheme, regular cleaning and disinfection, and the requirement that a Covid marshal be on site. The guidelines, published on Friday afternoon, also state that employers and site managers “must actively encourage all workers to get vaccinated as soon as possible”. Adina Cirson, ACT executive director of the Property Council of Australia, said while not all construction sites could resume from next week, the changes were “a very good step in the right direction”. “We have worked very closely with the government over the past two weeks with many of our industry peers to reassure the government that the real estate sector has a high compliance culture,” she said. “It is now up to the larger projects to demonstrate how this can be done safely and to comply with the new stringent requirements that are being placed on these sites to ensure the safety of workers in our community, that is the top priority by our members. “While the easing of some restrictions was welcomed, developers have already felt the effects of the shutdown. JWLand’s $ 500 million Founders Lane project in Braddon, due to be completed by the end of this year, is now facing significant ones Delays. “This two-week delay becomes a two-month delay for us,” said JWLand Director Aaron Ackland. Mr. Ackland said the delays would be particularly felt by small to medium-sized subcontractors, many of whom hired their workers during the lockdown. as well as future homeowners. “It’s an impact on the people who work in Revi he bought and wanted to move in [in early 2022] and now that’s going to be postponed until the end of the first quarter, or maybe mid-year, depending on any further delays we might realize in logistics, “he said.” The other sad thing, especially for our Founders Lane project, is that we had a significant portion of the units for NDIS, specialized homes for the disabled that cannot now be delivered in accordance with customer expectations. “Michael Hopkins, executive director of ACT Master Builders, said the ACT government’s decision to skip small construction projects The reopening plan was worrying: “Trying to pick favorites in the reopening plan for an entire industry will leave a stain on the ACT’s COVID-19 response that small operators and retailers will not forget,” he said by the end of next week three-week break correspond to more than $ 600 million, while another $ 105 million Ones would lose US dollars for every week that small housing projects were put on hold.The continued shutdown of the small housing sector will adversely affect the population currently building homes, especially first-time home buyers who are reluctant to purchase due to the stamp tax cuts Plots in the ACT were encouraged. ” Ms. Cirson agreed to the construction. The closure would have a lasting effect on the housing market, which is already under pressure. “Some activities are resuming but a lot is not yet resuming so there will definitely be an impact as our members have been behind the backball due to the Covid Safe plans they already had.” also on the spot, “she said.” These are tough decisions and we’re really grateful that we got the opportunity to show that we can get back to work and really do it safely. “Our coverage of the Health and safety aspects of this COVID-19 outbreak in the ACT and lockdown are freely available to everyone. However, we rely on subscription income to support our journalism. If you are able, please subscribe here. If you already have Subscribers, thank you for your support. You can also subscribe to our newsletter for regular updates. Our journalists work hard to keep the community updated with local, breaking news. So you can continue to access our trustworthy content:

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ACT construction workers are being “actively encouraged” to get vaccinated against Covid as the industry prepares for a gradual reopening starting next week.

The changes to the Covid restrictions announced on Friday have met mixed reactions from the construction industry, who say that after the two-week closure, significant project delays are expected.

Major construction sites will be among the first to resume, with strict Covid security measures in place, including a one-person-per-four-square-meter rule, regular cleaning and disinfection, and the requirement to have a Covid Marshal on-site .

The guidelines, published on Friday afternoon, also state that employers and site managers “must actively encourage all workers to get vaccinated as soon as possible”.

Adina Cirson, ACT executive director of the Property Council of Australia, said while not all construction sites could resume from next week, the changes were “a very good step in the right direction”.

“We have worked very hard with the government over the past two weeks with many of our industry peers to reassure the government that the real estate sector has a high compliance culture,” she said.

“It is now up to the larger projects to demonstrate how this can be done safely and to comply with the new stringent requirements that are being placed on these locations to ensure the safety of workers in our community, that is the number one priority from our members. “

ACT’s construction industry welcomes the reopening, but delays are expected

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The ACT construction industry says that after two weeks of tool failure, several months of delays will be felt.

news, latest news, construction, building, covid19, covid restrictions, canberra, covid, lock lock, canberra lock

2021-08-28T04: 00: 00 + 10: 00

https://players.brightcove.net/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6269707249001

https://players.brightcove.net/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6269707249001

While the relaxation of some restrictions was welcomed, developers were already feeling the effects of the shutdown.

“That two-week delay becomes a two-month delay for us,” said JWLand director Aaron Ackland.

Mr Ackland said the delays would be particularly felt by small to medium-sized subcontractors, many of whom hired their workers during the lockdown, as well as future homeowners.

“It’s an effect on the people who bought in the area and wanted to move in [in early 2022] and that will now drag on until the end of the first quarter or maybe mid-year, depending on further delays that we could realize with logistics, “he said.

“The other sad thing, especially for our Founders Lane project, is that we had a significant portion of the units for NDIS, Specialized Disabled Housing, which now cannot be delivered as the client’s expectations.”

JWLand's Founders Lane is facing delays following the ACT closure.  Image: Delivered

JWLand’s Founders Lane is facing delays following the ACT closure. Image: Delivered

Master Builders ACT chief Michael Hopkins said the ACT government’s decision to leave small construction projects out of the reopening plan was worrying.

“Trying to pick favorites in the reopening plan for an entire industry will tarnish the ACT’s COVID-19 response that small operators and retailers won’t forget,” he said.

Hopkins estimated that the three-week break would equate to more than $ 600 million by the end of next week, while another $ 105 million would be lost for every week that small housing projects were put on hold.

“Unfortunately, the ongoing closure of the small housing sector will have a detrimental impact on the population currently building homes, particularly first-time buyers who have been encouraged to purchase land due to the stamp duty cuts in the ACT.”

Ms. Cirson agreed that the shutdown would have a long-term impact on the housing market, which was already under pressure.

“Some activities are resuming but a lot is not yet resuming so there will definitely be an impact as our members have been behind the backball due to the Covid Safe plans they already had.” also in place, “she said.

“These are tough decisions and we’re really grateful that we got the opportunity to show that we can get back to work and really do it safely.”

Our coverage of the health and safety aspects of this COVID-19 outbreak in the ACT and lockdown is freely available to everyone. However, we rely on subscription income to support our journalism. If you are able to please subscribe here. If you are already a subscriber, thank you for your support. You can also Register for our newsletter for regular updates.

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